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 Jamming and filtering out of unwanted text messages

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Francis Anthony Itucas

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PostSubject: Jamming and filtering out of unwanted text messages   Wed Sep 24, 2008 10:40 am

Documentation for my research....

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Francis Anthony Itucas

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PostSubject: intro pt.1   Wed Sep 24, 2008 10:52 am

INTRODUCTION


The Philippines is known as the ‘text capital of the world’. ‘Presently each mobile phone user in the Philippines is sending out at least 10 text messages a day compared to about 3 text messages per user in the United Kingdom (Pertierra 2005a; cf. Ling 2004). About one Filipino in two is a subscriber to a mobile phone service.
At the end of 2007 four of the top mobile phone service providers in the country stated there were 42.78 million mobile phone subscribers in the Philippines.
One of the main reasons text messages became so popular in the Philippines is the affordability. In addition, text messaging was generally more reliable compared to a fixed phone line or relying on poor mobile phone coverage that included drop-outs.


Spam
In 2002, an increasing trend towards spamming mobile phone users through SMS prompted cellular service carriers to take steps against the practice, before it became a widespread problem. No major spamming incidents involving SMS had been reported as of March 2007, but the existence of mobile-phone spam has been noted by industry watchdogs, including Consumer Reports magazine and the Utility Consumers' Action Network (UCAN). In 2005, UCAN brought a case against Sprint for spamming its customers and charging $0.10 per text message.[17] The case was settled in 2006 with Sprint agreeing not to send customers Sprint advertisements via SMS.[18]
SMS expert Acision (used to be LogicaCMG Telecoms) reported a new type of SMS-malice at the end of 2006, noting the first instances of SMiShing (a cousin to email phishing scams). In SMiShing, users receive SMS messages posing to be from a company, enticing users to phone premium rate numbers, or reply with personal information.
SMS has caused subtle but interesting changes in society and language since it became popular. It has shown a change in students' academics as well as the law enforcement. SMS messages have caused a social impact and have changed the political campaign. SMS messaging has caused a change in social development as well.
Text messaging has put an impact on students academically, by creating an easier way to cheat on exams. In December 2002, a cheating scheme was uncovered during final-exam week at the University of Maryland, College Park. A dozen students were caught cheating on an accounting exam through the use of text messages on their mobile phones.[20] Teachers are finding it more difficult to keep track of their students cheating in the classroom. First there was plagiarism, but now students use text messaging to get answer keys during class. In December 2002, Hitotsubashi University in Japan failed 26 students for receiving e-mailed exam answers on their mobile phones.


What is spam?
Spam is an unwanted marketing message that can take the form of a text message that is sent to many people who have not requested to receive messages. Some people receive spam text messages and find these annoying. Spam messages affect all mobile operators, not just Orange. Some spam messages encourage you to call an expensive premium rate number (090 numbers), often to claim a prize.
Mobile phone spam is a form of spamming directed at the text messaging service of a mobile phone. It is described as mobile spamming, SMS spam or SpaSMS but is most frequently referred to as m-spam.
As the popularity of mobile phones surged in the early 2000s, frequent users of text messaging began to see an increase in the number of unsolicited (and generally unwanted) commercial advertisements being sent to their telephones through text messaging. This can be particularly annoying for the recipient, because unlike email, it is usually difficult or impossible to delete an SMS message without reading it.
In addition, most cell phone providers charge a fee for every message received, including spam, placing users in the unenviable position of having to pay to receive unwanted spam on their mobile phones.
Some telecommunications providers believe that SMS spam is going to be the next big challenge as the fast development of technology allows SMS spam to be sent at relatively low cost using Internet SMS portals.


Factors complicating SMS spam reduction
Fighting SMS spam is complicated by many factors, not the least of which is that most mobile phones have limited programmability and little if any capacity to run third-party spam-filtering software. Even were this not the case, however, filtering SMS spam at the recipient device level would be an imperfect solution because the user would still have to pay for the message once the provider sent it, even if software on the device blocked it from appearing on the device's display.
In addition, mobile phone providers in many jurisdictions are prohibited by law from blocking messages, including spam, that are sent to a telephone number. Even if message filtering is not explicitly forbidden, providers may be reluctant to assume the potential liability should a legitimate message of an emergency nature be blocked.
It's also arguable that providers have little interest in blocking SMS spam because subscribers typically are billed for every message received, including spam messages, unless they subscribe to an unlimited or package plan.


Countermeasures
There are, however, a few strategies that can help reduce SMS spam.
One of the most obvious SMS spam-reduction techniques is to guard one's cell phone number. One of the biggest sources of SMS spam is number harvesting carried out by Internet sites offering "free" ringtone downloads. In order to facilitate the downloads, users must provide their phones' numbers; which in turn are used to send frequent advertising messages to the phone. Wording in the sites' Terms of Service make this legal; and users may have to go as far as to change their cell phone numbers to stop the spam. Not only does this give you spam it also usually costs a lot of money to receive spam.
Another approach to reducing SMS spam that is offered by some carriers involves creating an alias address rather than using the cell phone's number as a text message address. Only messages sent to the alias are delivered; messages sent to the phone's number are discarded. In jurisdictions that forbid telecommunications providers from filtering SMS messages, the subscriber must specifically disable all text messages from being sent to the numerical address in order for the provider to be in compliance with the law.
Finally, most cell phone providers offer the option of completely disabling all text messaging services on a user's account. This extreme solution, however, is satisfactory only for those users who have neither the need nor the desire to utilize SMS at all.


Spam text messages
I got a spam text message today. This is rather unusual--the last one I received was at least before I got my Palm, so more than six months ago. At that time, I was still paying per text, and Cingular would refund me the $.10 for the initial message and $.10 to respond with "STOP" or "QUIT" (which legally require the sender to cease and desist...although since they're breaking the law sending you a message in the first place, the helpfulness of this is dubious. As with spam emails, it lets them know you're a "live one"). It doesn't matter quite so much to me now as I pay for a text messaging plan that can cover this, but as a principle, I do try to report spam (ebay, paypal and bank spam emails in particular). This for some reason feels even more invasive than email spam...this is my phone number!
Unsolicited text messages violate the FCC’s CAN-SPAM act and mainly just get on my nerves. The reason spam text messages are on the rise is that the spammers are not being investigated and punished, probably in large part because the carriers aren't being pushed to do something about it by their customers. As yet, carriers do not allow you to block certain senders while letting others get through--it's either all or nothing. I've heard rumors that T-Mobile at least will allow you to block all messages originating from an email address while allowing those sent from a wireless number, but I've not been able to verify that.


Cell Phone Text Message Spam A Growing Concern
Cell Phone Companies Want Spam Reported

Right now, someone you've never met may be trying to send you a shocking text message -- one that's inappropriate and illegal.
Worse yet, they may be doing the same thing to your children.
It's happening millions of times every day to cell phone users everywhere.
But to most of us it's invisible. We never see the text message spam. It gets caught in an elaborate net of filters and firewalls.
The spammers are getting better at getting through to you, and when they do, the message on your phone may shock you.
If you've ever received cell phone spam, you know how infuriating it can be—especially if you pay by the message. David Pogue of the New York Times recently got hit with a spate of junk text messages on his Verizon plan, and he figured out how to block most of them. If you're with AT&T or Verizon you can block any messages sent through the Internet, as well as change your text message address to an alias to thwart number-guessing spammers. Sprint will let you block specific addresses. T-Mobile lets you block email messages and set up filters based on specific phrases.


Mobile Text Message Spam Doubles
TechWeb News
February 28, 2005 02:07 PM
Spam accounts for close to half of all text messages sent to cell phones, a percentage that has more than doubled in just one year, said a text messaging provider Monday.
According to Wireless Services, which claims to manage 15 to 20 percent of all text message traffic for U.S. wireless carriers, 43 percent of all text is now spam. A year ago, said Wireless Services, that rate was just 18 percent.
In December 2004 alone, added the Bellevue, Wash.-based firm, 1.2 million spam text messages were blocked by the company.
Wireless Services attributes the surge to smarter and more sophisticated spammers who are moving beyond the traditional venue of e-mail. "While they initially sent messages to mobile phones via the Internet, they are now savvy enough about wireless networks to foil anti-spam technologies developed with e-mail in mind," said Rich Begert, the chief executive of Wireless Services, in a statement.


Text Message Spam, Keeping It Off Your Cell Phone
by Kirstin Cole
NEW YORK (CBS) ― Text messaging is now a 70-billion dollar global industry and growing! Unfortunately, text message 'spam' is growing too!

Text messenger, Bill Zaumen, says he gets slammed with text message spam all the time. "It doesn't cost them anything to do it. But it costs me ten cents a message of course to receive it," said Zaumen.
It may not sound like a lot but Zaumen says the text message spam charges were really starting to add up. "I could see it growing to thirty dollars or forty dollars a month very quickly," said Zaumen.
Consumer advocates say one reason the spam continues, because it puts money in the pockets of mobile operators. "The cell phone companies have a real disincentive to do anything about this problem, because they get to profit from all the spam traffic," explained Joe Ridout with Consumer Action. But an organization that represents all sectors of the wireless industry, says it's just the opposite.

They have every incentive to stop the spam. "It's an evolving threat. Spam does nothing but gum up the wireless network and therefore increase costs for consumers and increase costs for the carriers," explained Joe Farren, Director of Public Affairs for CTIA.

In general text message, spam is illegal under what's known as the 'can-spam' Legislation. But, there are loopholes. "If you have a pre-existing business relationship with a company, they're allowed to send you these kinds of messages," said Ridout.

So what can you do? Block the feature, as Zaumen eventually did. Also, be careful of who has your cell number and what you download onto your phone. Add your number to the do-not call registry, until the spam stops. If you do get charges you can always contest them with your phone company and file a complaint with the FCC.



[17] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Text_message#cite_note-Sprint_spam-16
[18] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Text_message#cite_note-Sprint_spam_result-17
[20] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Text_message#cite_note-autogenerated1-19
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Francis Anthony Itucas

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PostSubject: intro pt.2   Wed Sep 24, 2008 10:57 am

Spam text messages infiltrating more cell phones
Posted by Press News Service March 30, 2008 13:46PM
Categories: Breaking News

In cases where the text messages are truly unsolicited - meaning they aren't part of a business relationship between a service provider and customer or a person hasn't unwittingly signed up for the text messages - consumers have the right to sue for $500 per violation.
Beth Andersen first noticed it Dec. 10.
It was the Ypsilanti woman's first text message "spam" on her Verizon cell phone in the year she's had it.
The rub? She doesn't have a text-messaging plan and the uninvited advertisement cost her 25 cents, not something she wanted to contest with the cell phone company.
"It's not worth it to me," she said. "You spend half an hour on the phone to reduce charges and they don't even do it."
And even though it's illegal, cell phone industry experts say that U.S. customers will see a big increase in text mail spam over the next few years as cell phones become more powerful and a bigger part of American life.
A ban exists on sending unwanted commercial messages to wireless devices under the Federal Communications Commission's 2003 Controlling the Assault of Non-Solicited Pornography and Market Act, otherwise known as CAN-SPAM. It took effect in March 2005.
A commercial message is defined as one where the primary purpose is to advertise or promote a commercial product or service, according to the FCC. A message sent to a cell phone must use an Internet address that includes a domain name - in other words, messages sent from one mobile phone to another aren't included in the FCC's ban.
For now, text message spam is a minor inconvenience.
However, cell phone technology experts predict that it's only the beginning of a revolution in the industry that will completely change how wireless phones are used.
Tom Bowers, a security expert with Kaspersky Lab, which tracks malicious software, says Americans won't recognize the cell phone industry three years from now. He predicts cell phones will become like mini-computers, and bring with them all the inherent problems.
Bowers and Jennings both point to the Asian-Pacific region, where customers are getting eight to 10 spam text messages a day.
Bowers said that's where the U.S. market is headed. In the Asian-Pacific region, he said, cell phones are routinely used to surf the Web, send and receive e-mail and even to pay bills.
"It is going to be no different than laptops," Bowers said. "Three years from now, cell phones aren't going to be safe. The reason it is safe now is it is not easy enough to hold of information on cell phones and convert it to cash."
Once more personal information is more commonly held on U.S. cell phones, Bowers said, cyber crime will follow. He said that's already a $100 billion a year problem in the United States.
Kaspersky Lab found the first Trojan virus for Windows' mobile operating system earlier this month. In January, the first Trojan virus was discovered that targeted Apple's popular iPhone.
Bowers said soon cell phones will have to come with all the security measures that have generally been reserved for computers.
Ed Skoudis, a senior security consultant for Intelguardians and a University of Michigan graduate, said text message spam will be a short-term problem that'll be replaced with larger issues of security.
Skoudis said as cell phones get more memory and processing power, text messaging will be replaced by more efficient programs such as instant messaging.
He predicted that the iPhone would have an instant messaging application by this summer.
"As phones become more powerful, text messages won't be used," he said.
But Skoudis echoed the concern that the larger issue will be protecting cell phone users from malicious software and cyber crime.
"I wouldn't be surprised if in three years, you will need an anti-virus product for your cell phone," he said.

As more people subscribe to cellphone services — nearly 220 million in the U.S as of June, according to the CTIA Wireless Association — marketers see the mobile market as a ripe opportunity. According to research firm Informa, marketers will spend more than $11 billion on mobile advertising by 2011.
Some of the marketing is being done through legitimate channels. Companies such as eBay and Orbitz allow customers to sign up for services that send text message alerts. Cellphone operators are also starting to experiment with sending text messages promoting new services.
But if mobile operators want to exploit this marketing opportunity, they must tread lightly so as not to annoy customers with messages they don't want, experts say. And a recent rise in text message spam could jeopardize these efforts.


Text-message spam on the rise
By Kim Hart
The Washington Post
WASHINGTON — The spam messages that have long plagued e-mail inboxes are now finding victims through a more personal route: the cellphone.
Text messages are the latest tool for advertisers and scammers to target consumers. But unlike junk e-mail that can be deleted with the click of a button, text-message spam costs money for the person who receives it and chips away at the mobile phone's aura of privacy.
"It's so annoying because I get charged every time I get one," said Ryan Williams, 27, of Falls Church, Va., who receives half a dozen spam messages on a daily basis. They ask him to download ring tones, visit questionable sites over his phone's Internet connection or urge him to subscribe to horoscopes or sports-score updates.
Spam is often a nuisance, but more malicious messages can lead to a new form of fraud called smishing, a variation of a spam e-mail attack known as phishing. Smishing attacks disguise themselves as legitimate messages from e-commerce or financial sites such as eBay, PayPal or banks, and seek to dupe consumers into giving up account numbers or passwords.
As of 2005, federal agencies banned companies from sending unsolicited commercial e-mail and text messages to mobile phones. To receive promotional material or updates, consumers typically must text a message to a five-digit short code to opt in to the service.
But Simeon Coney, marketing director at anti-spam software maker AdaptiveMobile, said spammers are breaking the law, bombarding cellphone users with unwanted mail that could infect phones and BlackBerrys with viruses.
Consumer complaints about text-message spam have been sporadic, according to the Federal Trade Commission, the FBI and Consumers Union. But Coney said his firm is starting to see "overall increases in mobile-spam traffic."
An example of a spam text message:

'VIP Ticket: Congratulations U can claim 2 VIP row A2C Blu in Concert in November or Blu gift Guaranteed. Call 090XX XXXXXX to claim Ts&Cs www.xxxxxxxxxx.co.uk £3.75max'

According to a recent study by Ferris Research, 1.1 million cell phone spam messages were sent in 2007. San Francisco-based Cloudmark, Inc. estimates spam text messages could quadruple in the next year.

Unlike phone calls, mail or e-mail that are simply time-consuming annoyances, text message spam can actually cost the consumer money. Most wireless providers charge consumers for opening a text message - some as much as 10 cents per message.

In March 2005, as part of the CAN-SPAM act, the Federal Communications Commission adopted rules to prohibit sending unwanted commercial e-mail messages to wireless devices without prior permission. However, the ban only covers messages sent using an Internet address that includes an Internet domain name. The ban does not cover ‘short messages' sent from one phone to another that do not use an Internet address.

And even if you do receive a message that has been sent illegally, it can often be difficult to trace the sender and follow through with penalties. Wireless providers - who generate about $3 billion from text messaging fees - want the problem resolved as well. Many have implemented filters aimed at screening out junk messages. And they're pursuing legal action against perpetrators.

Verizon Wireless has won at least two cases against spammers using its wireless network. The company also filed suit against an unknown defendant who had sent a half million messages over the carrier's network in 2006. However, if the defendant in that case cannot be established, little more can be done.

To minimize damage to consumers, the FCC suggests following these guidelines:
  • Add your wireless number to the national Do-Not-Call registry at DoNotCall.gov.
  • Distribute your wireless number sparingly. Don't give it out in newsgroups, chat rooms or on web sites.
  • If you do open an unwanted text message, send a ‘stop' or ‘opt out' message in response. By law, companies are required to remove you from their list if you follow this step.
  • Always check the company's privacy policy when submitting your wireless phone number to any web site. Find out if the policy allows the company to sell your information.
  • Report spam text messages to the FCC if you feel they were sent illegally. Visit FCC.gov/cgb/complaints.html, and fill out the online form 1088.
  • Contact your wireless provider about any unwanted messages as soon as you receive them. Ask them to send you the specific policy regarding junk messages. Some may offer refunds on a case-by-case basis, while others track complaints in order to pursue legal action.
    • AT&T only charges customers when the message is opened. It also offers filters to block unwanted messages.
    • Qwest allows users to disable the text message feature by calling 800-244-1111 .
    • Sprint Nextel offers spam-filtering technology at no charge. If you do receive a message, use its online form to report it.
    • T-Mobile allows users to create their own filters to block specific text messages.
    • Verizon Wireless allows users to block messages sent from e-mail addresses, domain names and web sites.

In addition to costing consumers money, some of these unwanted text messages have turned out to be what's known as "smishing" attacks or "phishing" attacks adapted for the SMS protocol used to send text messages. Some of these attacks ask recipients to register for a service.
Then they attempt to get people to accept a virus or worm on their handset. Others try to extract credit card numbers and other private data. Most spammers send messages from the Internet using a computer, which allows them to avoid charges associated with sending messages from a phone. But in many ways, this makes finding the spammers relatively easy for the wireless phone companies.
Using basic filtering tools, cell phone operators can detect high volumes of messages coming from a particular Internet account. And if a particular region is affected, they can easily detect an attack. That's exactly how Verizon Wireless was able to stop an outbreak of text message spam in May, when 1.1 million messages offering discount prescription medications were sent to Verizon Wireless customers in New Jersey.
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PostSubject: intro pt.3   Wed Sep 24, 2008 11:00 am

How to Block Cellphone Spam
“According to Wikipedia, this sleazy practice is described as ‘mobile spamming, SMS spam or SpaSMS, but is most frequently referred to as m-spam.’
“It’s actually far worse than regular e-mail spam, for three reasons. First, you generally can’t delete it without opening it first.
“Second, you have to pay for it. (And, of course, the senders pay nothing, since they can send text messages from a computer’s e-mail program for nothing.)
“Third, there’s no way to stop it. You can’t install an anti-SMS spam program on your cellphone.
An AT&T representative revealed the presence of an astonishing little-known cellular feature: you can block cellular spam.
“Text messages sent from the Internet are addressed as follows: [Your 10-digit wireless number]@txt.att.net.
“What spammers try to do, of course, is attempt to guess your number, largely by trial and error. This brings me to the second capability we offer our customers. Let’s say you want to block spam, but still want to receive messages originating from the Net that you would actually find useful (airline schedules, hotel reservations, etc.). For this purpose, we let you replace your wireless number with an alias. It could be some quirky name, or whatever you like. [You share this address only with people you know.] This could disrupt the guessing game spammers play to try to discern your number and sent you their junk.
“Though not perfect, our efforts have helped keep spam in the category of minor, though annoying, phenomenon. Thanks for listening.”
The beauty of this feature, of course, is that it blocks ONLY text messages from the Internet. Your friends, using cellphones, can still text you.
As it turns out, Verizon Wireless offers these features, too. Sprint and T-Mobile don’t go quite as far, but they do offer some text-spam filtering options. Here’s how you find the controls for each company:
  • AT&T: Log in at mymessages.wireless.att.com. Under Preferences, you’ll see the text-blocking and alias options. Here’s also where you can block messages from specific e-mail addresses or Web sites.
  • Verizon Wireless: Log in at vtext.com. Under Text Messaging, click Preferences. Click Text Blocking. You’re offered choices to block text messages from e-mail or from the Web. Here again, you can block specific addresses or Web sites. (Here’s where you set up your aliases, too.)
  • Sprint: No auto-blocking is available at all, but you can block specific phone numbers and addresses. To get started, log in at www.sprint.com. On the top navigation bar, click My Online Tools. Under Communication Tools, click Text Messaging. On the Compose a Text Message page, under Text Messaging Options, click Settings & Preferences. In the text box, you can enter a phone number, email address or domain (such as Comcast.net) that you want to block.
  • T-Mobile: T-Mobile doesn’t yet offer a “block text messages from the Internet” option. You can block all messages sent by e-mail, though, or permit only messages sent to your phone’s e-mail address or alias, or create filters that block text messages containing certain phrases. It’s all waiting when you log into www.t-mobile.com and click Communication Tools.



Mobile Phone Spam?
By camper on Thu, 01/06/2006 - 3:56pm
Last night I received what I think is the first case of mass mobile phone SPAM in Qatar. In the early evening I got an SMS from 3406819963 which said:
CONGRATULATIONS! LOTTERY WINNER
Your mobile number attached to ticker number 5XX-XX won US$1.116,000.00
Call:00346-6-819-963.
lotterypostwin/-a-t-/malaysia.com
I thought "Oh man...now we're into mobile phone spam" and forgot about. Then, later this evening my friend with me received the exact same message. Now our two numbers are totally unrelated in sequence. Also, I'm a contract user and she's got a pay as you go account. I'm wondering if they are just SMSing a whole range of Q-Tel phone numbers just to see who will catch.
With e-mail we are now sort of oblivious to spam. It comes and goes and we don't really bother with it. But with this, it's a bit different since the message may catch you off guard and you may think that the message is from some real competition they entered. Worse still, most modern mobile phones highlight numbers so you may accidentally dial it.
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PostSubject: reflection.. learning.. ug uban pang matang.. :D   Wed Sep 24, 2008 11:27 am

i already knew that the Philippines is the text capital of the world.. but, i never expected that it would reach more than 42 million phone subscribers.. affraid it would maybe because of people that would not be contented with just only one cellphone, not included those who are subscribing for business purposes.. wireless telecommunication companies would really be richer.. Cool damn.. telecommunication is a good business Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy

if only people would be mature enough to think, there would be no problem just like spamming.. fuckin people abuse the advantages that the technology brings us.. even telecommunication companies would not think of proper solutions to stop these problems.. for me, they would not think of a solution because they would also benefit from these actions.. please tell me if what i am thinking is wrong.. damn..

i am still on the process of gathering data because i think my sources is not enough for this study..

mjo late sa aq sked.. ky intro plang aq nbhat.. atay.. Sad Sad Sad


Last edited by Francis Anthony Itucas on Thu Oct 02, 2008 12:54 am; edited 1 time in total
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PostSubject: Re: Jamming and filtering out of unwanted text messages   Wed Sep 24, 2008 3:44 pm

reflections/learnings pls ...
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PostSubject: Re: Jamming and filtering out of unwanted text messages   Thu Sep 25, 2008 4:04 am

rsgamboa wrote:
reflections/learnings pls ...

gd day sir.. kanang before sa imo post sir.. mao nah xa.. kulang pa nah sir? ang title sa post ky.. reflection.. learning.. ug uban pang matang.. Very Happy
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PostSubject: update....   Sun Oct 05, 2008 3:02 am

damn.. i really had a bad time looking for related lit about my topic.. they are all about problems and complaints, no solutions shown.. it doesn't give any idea how to solve it.. Sad Sad Sad
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PostSubject: Re: Jamming and filtering out of unwanted text messages   Sun Oct 05, 2008 7:27 pm

Francis Anthony Itucas wrote:
damn.. i really had a bad time looking for related lit about my topic.. they are all about problems and complaints, no solutions shown.. it doesn't give any idea how to solve it.. Sad Sad Sad


hmmmm .... pls don't use bad words ....
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PostSubject: Re: Jamming and filtering out of unwanted text messages   Mon Oct 06, 2008 2:27 am

rsgamboa wrote:
Francis Anthony Itucas wrote:
damn.. i really had a bad time looking for related lit about my topic.. they are all about problems and complaints, no solutions shown.. it doesn't give any idea how to solve it.. Sad Sad Sad


hmmmm .... pls don't use bad words ....


sorry sir.. Smile Smile
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PostSubject: Re: Jamming and filtering out of unwanted text messages   Mon Oct 06, 2008 3:07 pm

umm....medyo related man diay ta vice noh...

- Embarassed Embarassed Embarassed -
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PostSubject: Re: Jamming and filtering out of unwanted text messages   Tue Oct 07, 2008 11:29 pm

julaysa_halilio wrote:
umm....medyo related man diay ta vice noh...

- Embarassed Embarassed Embarassed -


aw.. mura.. aq ky sa cp lng.. Very Happy lisod au ngita ug related lit sa wireless comm about spamming oi.. Sad Sad Sad
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PostSubject: research   Mon Mar 01, 2010 9:36 pm

Great essay site [tresearch papers]
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